CTSFW

Concordia Theological Seminary – Fort Wayne, IN

CTSFW

Concordia Theological Seminary – Fort Wayne, IN

Continuing Education

2019 Season

For a complete list of sites and topics for 2019, please check out the flyer for continuing education opportunities!
Complete information and online registration for individual sites will be available as it is finalized.

2019 Continuing Education Flyer

Contact Information

Kara J. Mertz
Administrative Assistant
Continuing Education

CE@ctsfw.edu
260.452.2103

Elberta, Alabama

Preaching Matthew

Dr. David P. Scaer
November 20–22, 2019

A detailed study in the First Gospel as instruction manual for the early Church will be presented. Attention is paid to the organization of the teaching materials into five discourses and the progression from one to the other in preparation of the catechumen to join himself to the church in Baptism and to meet Christ in the Eucharist. Also discussed is the Evangelist’s placement of the episodes from the life of Jesus between each of the discourses. Special consideration is given to the Lord’s Prayer and the relationship of the miraculous feedings to Christ’s offering Himself to the Church in Holy Communion. Along with isagogical materials, the role of Matthew in the fathers of the Church in the first centuries A.D. is discussed to show how Matthew is rightly understood as “The Church’s Gospel.” (1.5 CEU)

Cupertino, California

Mysteries of the Gospel of Mark, the Churchly Gospel

Dr. Peter J. Scaer
June 11–13, 2019

Mark’s Gospel is perhaps the most mysterious and least appreciated. Largely ignored by the early church and underestimated by modern scholarship, Mark has much to offer today's Church. His portrait of Jesus is strange but compelling. His teaching on the cross and Christ's Gospel message should resonate especially with Lutherans, providing a bridge to the Pauline Epistles. Even more, Mark accentuates the powerfully sacramental character of our Lord's ministry. For Mark, Christ's power manifests itself in Baptism and his enduring presence is to be found in the Bread of the Eucharist. For a Church that so often appears like a boat tossed about on the sea, facing persecution and riddled with doubt, the Gospel of Mark may very well be the Gospel for the 21st Century Church. (1.5 CEU)

Grass Valley, California

Issues in Theological Anthropology for the Ministry

Rev. Scott E. Stiegemeyer
July 8–12, 2019

The human body is the philosophical and theological battleground of our time. Issues of sexuality, natural law, and bioethics challenge the Christian understanding of what it means to be human. This course will mine the Scriptures, Confessions, and Church history for the best foundation of human life. We will trace the notion of the body through the major loci, especially creation, incarnation, and new creation. Participants will be better prepared to face ethical and spiritual challenges with a positive Christocentric vision of human flourishing. Topics will include genetic medicine, human bio-enhancement, and transhumanism. (3.0 CEU)

Carlyle, Illinois

Making Music for the Lord: The Role of Choral Music in the Divine Service According to Chronicles and the New Testament

Dr. John W. Kleinig
September 17–19, 2019

The use of instrumental music in the Divine Service has always been regarded with some suspicion because it was not authorized in the Pentateuch or in the New Testament. This course considers what Chronicles has to say about its divine institution, its liturgical function, and its theological significance and how this has influenced the New Testament and the use of choral music in the Lutheran Church. (CEU 1.5)

Elgin, Illinois

C. F. W. Walther Today

Dr. Cameron A. MacKenzie
June 18–20, 2019

C. F. W. Walther, a founding father of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod and its leading theologian in the first generation, had much to say about the topics of his day; but does he have anything to say to people today? This course seeks to answer this question by looking at Walther's ideas regarding topics that are still of interest in the contemporary church. These include topics like: “What does it mean to be a Lutheran” “Does Church fellowship still matter?” “How should church and government interact?” and “How does predestination affect the preaching of the Gospel—if it does at all?” (1.5 CEU)

Peoria, Illinois

Early Christian Preaching and Catechesis in a Pluralist Society

Rev. Chad Kendall
June 4–6, 2019

What does preaching and catechesis look like in the New Testament and in the Patristic period? The Church is entering a period of time which looks more and more like the early days of Christianity. What must pastors consider as they engage in preaching and catechesis in a pluralist society? What does the hearer need to hear? The course will consider major ideological shifts which have taken place in the Western world and how these shifts have affected the piety and faith of Lutherans today. Major Greek themes predominate in the New Testament as the apostles preach and teach. These themes will be examined in the Greek New Testament. Further, select Patristic homilies will be studied with some consideration as to how Patristic themes may aid our preaching and catechesis today. (CEU 1.5)

Fort Wayne, Indiana

Zechariah

Dr. Reed Lessing
July 29–31, 2019

Based upon Dr. Lessing’s forthcoming CPH commentary on Zechariah, this seminar includes a historical overview of the prophet’s setting, his visions, and especially his theology. All participants will receive a Lenten series based upon Zechariah that includes sermons, orders of worship, and a Bible Study. (1.5 CEU)

Fort Wayne, Indiana

Making Music for the Lord: The Role of Choral Music in the Divine Service According to Chronicles and the New Testament

Dr. John W. Kleinig
September 23–25, 2019

The use of instrumental music in the Divine Service has always been regarded with some suspicion because it was not authorized in the Pentateuch or in the New Testament. This course considers what Chronicles has to say about its divine institution, its liturgical function, and its theological significance and how this has influenced the New Testament and the use of choral music in the Lutheran Church. (CEU 1.5)

Milford, Iowa

Zechariah: Behold Your King!

Dr. Reed Lessing
May 22–24, 2019

Based upon Dr. Lessing’s forthcoming CPH commentary on Zechariah, this seminar includes a historical overview of the prophet’s setting, his visions, and especially his theology. All participants will receive a Lenten series based upon Zechariah that includes sermons, orders of worship, and a Bible Study. (1.5 CEU)

Davenport, Iowa

The Gospel of John

Dr. William C. Weinrich
July 29–31, 2019

Although the Gospel of John is frequently interpreted to be without sacramental meaning or reference, the manner in which the story of Jesus is told reveals a pervasive Christological, sacramental, and ecclesial perspective. The narrative about Jesus is a narrative about the life of the church grounded in and instantiated in Baptism and the Eucharist. Thus, the story of Jesus is descriptive of the “Way,” that is, of the manner of life begun and sustained through the Sacraments of the church. It is descriptive of the "Truth," that is, of the reality of grace and faith established in the Sacraments of the church; it is descriptive of the "Life," that is, of the life of God which in Jesus has become the life of man. (1.5 CEU)

Le Mars, Iowa

The Role of the Old Testament in the Church Today

Dr. Dean O. Wenthe
September 16–18, 2019

How does the Old Testament guide the Church today? How can the laws and history of ancient Israel speak relevantly and authoritatively to the community of faith in the modern world? To answer these questions, it is crucial that the Old Testament be interpreted properly. Hermeneutics, the art and science of interpretation, becomes the key step in appropriating the Old Testament text. This course will survey the various efforts, both in academic circles and in parish setting, to formulate an adequate answer. It will seek to formulate a Lutheran and confessional perspective with a view to the actual use of the Old Testament in the preaching, teaching, and larger life of the parish. (1.5 CEU)

Knowles, Oklahoma

Guys with Funny Names: Nahum, Obadiah, and Habakkuk

Dr. Ryan M. Tietz
June 10–12, 2019

Within Christian Scripture, books about foreign nations are oftentimes overlooked. However, these books function to describe the inbreaking of the kingdom of God with the destruction of evil. This course explores the rich theology of these often overlooked books. (CEU 1.5)

Rogue River, Oregon

The Presence of the Son Before Christ

Dr. Charles A. Gieschen
July 8–10, 2019

This course will study the importance of the Old Testament traditions about the Angel of YHWH, the Name of YHWH, the Glory of YHWH, and the Word of YHWH for early expressions of the identity of Jesus Christ within the eternal mystery of YHWH, the one God of Israel. Select portions of the Pauline Epistles, the Gospel of John, the Epistle to the Hebrews, and Revelation will be examined in order to further the teaching and preaching of Christ from all the Scriptures. (CEU 1.5)

Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania

Early Christian Preaching and Catechesis in a Pluralist Society

Rev. Chad Kendall
August 5–7, 2019

What does preaching and catechesis look like in the New Testament and in the Patristic period? The Church is entering a period of time which looks more and more like the early days of Christianity. What must pastors consider as they engage in preaching and catechesis in a pluralist society? What does the hearer need to hear? The course will consider major ideological shifts which have taken place in the Western world and how these shifts have affected the piety and faith of Lutherans today. Major Greek themes predominate in the New Testament as the apostles preach and teach. These themes will be examined in the Greek New Testament. Further, select Patristic homilies will be studied with some consideration as to how Patristic themes may aid our preaching and catechesis today. (CEU 1.5)

Plano, Texas

Lutheran Giants: Luther, Gerhardt, and Bach

Kantor Richard Resch
June 26–28, 2019

This study will look at the contributions of Martin Luther, Paul Gerhardt and Johann Sebastian Bach to the hymnological, musical and theological heritage of the Lutheran Church. As towering pillars of Confessional Lutheranism, what does each man bring to this glorious heritage that so identifies us? How can we as pastors and church musicians still make faithful use of their good gifts in the Lutheran Church of today? (CEU 1.5)

Charlottesville, Virginia

The Book of Acts: The Church Comes into Being

Dr. Peter J. Scaer
August 5–7, 2019

This class will look at how the Church, as we know it, came into being. Special attention will be paid to Christ’s continuing work through the Holy Spirit. Topics also include the church’s apostolic foundation, its sacramentology, missiology, the place of martyrdom, and the relationship between Peter and Paul. (1.5 CEU)

Almena, Wisconsin

Luther and the Psalms

Dr. Brian T. German
June 4–6, 2019

This course examines some of the most influential works of Dr. Martin Luther on the psalms and places a particular focus on how the psalms shaped Luther as a pastoral theologian. (1.5 CEU)

Shawano, Wisconsin

New Testament Patterns of Pastoral Ministry

Dr. Charles A. Gieschen
June 24–26, 2019

This class will study various portions of the New Testament, especially the words and actions of Jesus and Paul, to see and understand the guidance these texts offer for shaping our pastoral theology and practice. (1.5 CEU)

Jackson, Wyoming

Early Christian Preaching and Catechesis in a Pluralist Society

Rev. Chad Kendall
June 10–14, 2019

What does preaching and catechesis look like in the New Testament and in the Patristic period? The Church is entering a period of time which looks more and more like the early days of Christianity. What must pastors consider as they engage in preaching and catechesis in a pluralist society? What does the hearer need to hear? The course will consider major ideological shifts which have taken place in the Western world and how these shifts have affected the piety and faith of Lutherans today. Major Greek themes predominate in the New Testament as the apostles preach and teach. These themes will be examined in the Greek New Testament. Further, select Patristic homilies will be studied with some consideration as to how Patristic themes may aid our preaching and catechesis today. (CEU 3.0)

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